Swedish Drug Buyer Sentenced to One Year in Prison


A 26-year-old man from Högsby, Sweden, was sentenced to one year in prison for drug smuggling and drug possession connected to several purchases made on darknet markets. Many of the drugs he had purchased on the darknet, the man eventually learned, ended up in the hands of Swedish Customs officers during his own investigation.

According to the prosecutor, Customs intercepted drug packages intended for the man on a routine basis. Customs intercepted packages of cocaine, marijuana, MDMA, and thousands of assorted pills. One package contained 446 grams of marijuana. Throughout the case, the young man routinely denied any accusations related to drug distribution or redistribution. In fact, he initially distanced himself so far from the drugs that he told the police he had no idea what some of the packages contained.

He maintained a single defense: that he only ordered the drugs on behalf of one of his friends. Or, interchangeably, that one of his friends used his address when he placed orders with vendors on the darknet. He acknowledged, in court, that he had willingly accepted the half-kilo package of marijuana for his friend but denied knowledge of the majority of the additional packages seized by Customs.

Law enforcement remained unconvinced, however. During the execution of a search warrant at the man’s house, the police discovered many of the same drugs they had intercepted. The drugs that he had claimed he had not known about or, in some cases, what the actual substance was or how it acted on the human body.

The court listened to his defense and reacted as any rational person would react in light of the overwhelming stack of incriminating evidence gathered by the prosecution. They accused him of importing the drugs for resale. Investigators uncovered text messages, recorded payment information, and a bitcoin wallet where the man had stored his bitcoin. The text messages indicated that part of his defense may actually have been truthful. The authorities found evidence indicating that the marijuana, in fact, had been purchased for a friend. The ledger of payments, though, suggested that the Högsby man did more than simply place orders for his less technologically inclined friends.

Although he continued to deny any drug distribution accusations, he finally admitted that the additional drugs discovered at his house had actually been his and had been intended for personal use. The prosecution disagreed and argued that the text messages clearly indicated he had worked with at least one accomplice. The court sentenced the man to one year in prison for five drug smuggling and possession offenses.



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